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Posted by on Oct 7, 2013 | 4 comments

Torrey Pines: Rare Trees and Rock Formations

On a thin coastal strip of San Diego County, 2,000 to 3,000 Torrey Pines survive even though they are surrounded by some of the most populated areas of Southern California. At one point during the 20th century, only 100 trees survived the harsh environment.  Conservation efforts have permitted the wild population to increase to current levels.

The Torrey Pine is the rarest pine species in the United States and can only be seen on a natural reserve located between the cities of Del Mar and San Diego or on Santa Rosa Island (part of the Channel Islands National Park).

The Torrey Pine, the rarest tree in North America, Torrey Pine State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

During my visit, I felt extremely blessed to appreciate the beauty of the pines which lend its name to the reserve.  Nevertheless, the reserve offers 8 miles of trails on a plateau with cliffs that overlook the beach.  Many different kinds of wildlife and flora are found within the reserve, including bobcats, foxes, skunks, raccoons, coyotes, rabbits, cacti and coastal chaparral.

In other words, this is an opportunity to enjoy one of the few wild stretches of land in Southern California.

The Trails

There are several moderate and beautiful trails within the reserve.  It is a good idea to park at the top of the reserve, close to the visitor’s center and get a map with instructions. Others park at the beach level to avoid the entrance fee and access the reserve on foot.

The first highlight of our walk was Red Butte, a terracotta promontory from where the entire reserve and even downtown San Diego can be seen.

Red Butte, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

View from Red Butte, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

It was interesting to spot unusual formations in a small canyon located next to Red Butte.

Skull like formation, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

We continued moving towards the ocean with the desire to check Yucca and Razor Points.  These two areas are probably the most well known in the reserve.  They can be conceived as rippled, curvy walls of rock.  Patches of terrain beside them are reminiscent of badlands.  Some spots look like melting chocolate ice cream while others present domes of colors (thing of soft pinks and pale yellows).

Yucca (left) and Razor (right) Points

Yucca (left) and Razor (right) Points

 

We checked Yucca Point first.

Yucca Point, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

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View from Yucca Point, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

Formations next to  Yucca Point, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

Then, we moved on to Razor Point.

Rock Formations, Torrey Pine State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

Razor Point, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

Razor Point, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

Razor Point, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

Razor Point, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

View from Razor Point, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

View from Razor Point, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

Razor Point, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

After delighting our eyes with the curious rock formations, we made our way to the southern end of the park (where Flat Rock is located) thru the Beach Trail.

Flat Rock, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

Black’s Beach

Let me be clear from the beginning.  Black’s Beach is known as San Diego’s unofficial nude beach and as you can imagine people make a big fuss about this place.  To be fair, let me also say this is a famous surfing spot where big swells can be experienced due to an underwater canyon.

I have read about the seclusion of this place, how the access is very difficult, how people get caught in the high tide and how some have even died trying to get there (falling from the cliffs while trying to follow ‘trails’ left by others).

So, we arrived to the Flat Rock area (which is in Torrey Pines State Beach) and saw a stretch path over the rocks at the bottom of the cliff.  We followed the crowds and landed on another beach.  In the distance, a pier was seen a mirage because of the thick marine layer.  We decided to walk to that pier.

Walk around this rock and you are on Black's Beach

Walk around this rock and you are on Black’s Beach

 

This is how it looks at the other side.  At this point, you are officially in Black's Beach.

This is how it looks at the other side. At this point, you are officially in Black’s Beach.

 

As we walked, I realized we were approaching the Scripps Pier (‘cause it is the only one in the area) and that could only mean one thing: we were in Black’s Beach.  I still had my doubts since there was a crowd walking in the same direction and there were no indication in the reserve’s map. Plus, the access was so easy, nothing to do with the tangled descriptions found on the Internet.

Black's Beach, San Diego, California

 

Black's Beach, San Diego, California

 

After passing thru a rocky area, the beach widened.  It was then when I saw some people, close to the bottom of the cliffs, sunbathing in a natural state (let’s call it that way).  We didn’t pay much attention and continue walking.  We realized the pier was not that close and decided to go back.  At least, we were able to see the paragliders zooming over the cliffs (that was cool).

 

Gliders from the the Torrey Pines Glide Port, San Diego, California

 

I don’t understand from where all the commotion about Black’s Beach comes from.  Even the San Diego Tourism Authority presents it as one of the top attractions in the city because of its beauty (yeah, right).  To me, it was a meh beach (nice cliffs but not much more).  I have seen better in the area.

Walking in Torrey Pines State Beach

So, we made it back to Flat Rock and started to walk north thru the Torrey Pines State Beach.  This is another way to appreciate the reserve since the cliffs are very colorful and full of crazy formations. To me, the view from the bottom is fascinating since it is almost impossible to determine what lies at the top.

Torrey Pines State Beach, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

Torrey Pines State Beach, Torrey Pines State Reserve, San Diego, California

 

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Cliffs at Torrey Pines State Beach, San Diego, California

 

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The Lagoon

A lagoon that is vital to migrating seabirds is also within the reserve limits.  It is visible from several lookouts.

Details

  • The Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve is located about 18 miles north of Downtown San Diego.
  • Surfing and swimming are popular at Torrey Pines State Beach.  The usual facilities (restrooms, changing rooms and lifeguards) are available.
  • Guided nature tours are offered during the weekends.
  • Parking inside the reserve is $10.
  • Roadside parking is also available.
  • Be careful when accessing Black’s Beach.  The only maintained routes are the Beach Trail coming from the State Park and a trail coming from The Glider Port.  A lot of people have been involved in accidents while trying to get access descending the cliffs.

Have you visited Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve?

4 Comments

  1. I love Torrey Pines! There is a trail (Ho Chi Minh) that some of the surfers take down to Blacks. Have you heard of it? It’s a really cool trail, but there is one part where there is only enough width for your feet to barely fit and it always amazes me that guys take their surfboards down it. You captured some great shots!

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